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Botswana Popular Destinations

Moremi Game Reserve

Moremi Game Reserve is a Game Reserve in Botswana. It rests on the eastern side of the Okavango Delta and was named after Chief Moremi of the BaTawana tribe. Moremi was designated as a Game Reserve, and not a National Park, when it was created. This designation meant local people, the BaSarwa or Bushmen that lived there were allowed to stay in the reserve.

Moremi Game Reserve covers much of the eastern side of the Okavango Delta and combines permanent water with drier areas, which create some startling and unexpected contrasts. Some prominent geographical features of the Reserve are Chiefs Island and the Moremi Tongue.[1] In the Moremi Reserve one can experience excellent views of Savannah game as well as bird-watching on the lagoons. There are also thickly wooded areas, which are home to the Cape wild dog and leopard. To the northeast lies the Chobe National Park which borders the Moremi Game Reserve.

Although just under 5,000 square kilometres (1,900 sq mi) in extent, it is a surprisingly diverse Reserve, combining mopane woodland and acacia forests, floodplains and lagoons. Only about 30% of the Reserve is mainland, with the bulk being within the Okavango Delta itself.

Moremi Game Reserve, although not one of the largest parks, presents insights and views even for the most experienced of travelers. It is home to nearly 500 species of bird (from water birds to forest dwellers), and a vast array of other species of wildlife including Cape buffalo, Angolan giraffe, black rhinoceros, Southwest African lion, elephant, hippopotamus, zebra, South African cheetah, hyena, jackal, impala, and red lechwe. Cape wild dogs (Lycaon pictus pictus) inhabit this reserve[2] and has been the subject of a project run in the area since 1989; thus this species is often seen wearing collars emplaced by researchers. The Moremi area contains one of the most significant extant habitat areas for L. pictus.

Maun, Botswana

Manyana

Manyana is a village located in the Southern District of Botswana. It had 3,550 inhabitants at the 2011 census. Dr David livingstone had a missionary school under London Missionary church (LMS). A tree which was used as a classroom is still alive at Motlhatseng, the name of that tree is motlhatsa. There are rock paintings done by the bush men and also a cave called Mma-Sechele. Manyana has a perenial river called kolobeng which starts at Jwetle goes throgh Ramoshage dam then devide the village into two parts. It goes through Ramotlhabeng heading to Mmankgodi then connects Metsimotlhabe river at Kumakwane village.

DIMAWE HILL : This was a battle field of numerious tribes fighting the boers. It was around 1885 when the pregnant wife of Kgosi Sechele was taken from the battle field to the cafe at the rock paintings and that cafe is known as Mmasechele cafe. After defeting the boers at Dimawe the collabirated tribes moved separately to different areas of Botswana. Bangwaketse moved to west, Bakwena to North West etc while Bahurutshe remained there. They were coerced to move to kolobeng river because of water.

Manyana, Botswana

Domboshaba

Domboshaba ruins is a cultural and heritage site in Botswana originally occupied towards the end of the Great Zimbabwe period (1250–1450 AD). The site is a respected place for the people living in the region and it is believed that the chief lived on the top of the hill together with his helpers or assistants.

The phrase Dombo means hill and the word Shaba means red. Domboshaba is also called the Luswingo used to be the settlement of the Great chief of that time. The ruins are similar to the Mwenemotapa. The chief's wife settled below the hill. Domboshaba has a well called the Mantenge Well which never dries up and the well is 7 metres deep and is situated in the rock.

Domboshaba, Botswana

Mochudi

Mochudi is one of the larger villages in Botswana with a population of 44,815 people in 2011. It is situated in the Bakgatla tribal region, in Kgatleng District, about 37 km (23 mi) northeast of Gaborone. The village lies several kilometres from the main Gaborone–Francistown road, and can be accessed through a short turn at Pilane. Mochudi was settled by the Tswana people in 1871

 
Mochudi, Botswana

Lake Ngami

Lake Ngami is an endorheic lake in Botswana north of the Kalahari Desert. It is seasonally filled by the Taughe River, an effluent of the Okavango River system flowing out of the western side of the Okavango Delta. It is one of the fragmented remnants of the ancient Lake Makgadikgadi. Although the lake has shrunk dramatically beginning from 1890, it remains an important habitat for birds and wildlife, especially in flood years.

Lake Ngami had many famous visitors during the 19th (and into the 20th) century. In 1849 David Livingstone described it as a "shimmering lake, some 80 miles [130 km] long and 20 [30 km] wide". Livingstone also made a few cultural notes about the people living in this area; he noticed they had a story similar to that of the Tower of Babel, except that the builders' heads were "cracked by the fall of the scaffolding" (Missionary Travels, chap. 26). Charles John Andersson (who published Lake Ngami; or, Explorations and Discoveries during Four Years' Wanderings in the Wilds of South western Africa in 1856) and Frederick Thomas Green also visited the area in the early 1850s. Frederick Lugard led a British expedition to the lake in 1896. Arnold Weinholt Hodson passed through the area on his journey from Serowe to Victoria Falls in 1906.

Ngami Lacuna, a methane lake on Saturn's moon Titan is named after this lake.

Maun, Botswana

Tsabong

Tsabong or Tshabong is the administrative centre of the Kgalagadi District, Botswana. It is located in the Kalahari Desert. The population was 8939 in 2011 census.

The primary hospital in Tsabong serves a huge outlying area and includes several tuberculosis refuges where patients and their families can stay while undergoing lengthy outpatient treatment.

Near the town is the Tsabong kimberlite field, one of the largest diamondiferous kimberlite fields in the world.

Tsabong, Botswana

Mololepolole

Molepolole is a city in Botswana. It lies in the south east of the country. The people who reside in Molepolole are the Bakwena, who are one of the eight major tribes in Botswana. The Bakwena chief was among the three chiefs who went to England to seek protection from the British in the colonial era. Molepolole serves as the capital of the Bakwena. It was named after the Molepolole river.

It is one of the largest traditional villages in Africa with a population of over 69,789 people as of 2008. It lies 50 kilometres west of the national capital Gaborone, and acts as gateway for exploring the Kalahari Desert.

It has a large traditional court (or kgotla) and is the location of the Scottish Livingstone Hospital, one of the nation's largest.

Molepolole, Botswana

Sua Pan

The Sua Pan or Sowa Pan is a large natural topographic depression within the Makgadikgadi region of Botswana. It is located near the village of Sowa, whose name means salt in the language of the San.The Sua salt pan is one of three large pans within the Makgadikgadi, the other two being Nxai Pan and Nwetwe Pan.

The Sua Pan was first described to the European world by David Livingstone, pursuant to his explorations in this region. Significant archaeological recoveries have been made within the Nwetwe Pan, featuring stone-age tools from peoples who lived in this area when a large year-round lake occupied the Sua and Nwetwe Pans.

The Brines of Sua Pan being one of the largest playa lakes in the world spans approximately 24000 square kilometers. While sodium chloride is the prime constituent, there are many other salts found within this area such as sodium carbonate, sodium bicarbonate, sodium sulfate, and minor amounts of potassium chloride (potash).

Currently, Sua Pan is a seasonal lake; it fills with water during the Summer rainy season and retains water until April or May. Among the more successful wildlife conservation projects in Botswana was the community-initiated Nata Bird Sanctuary in the northeast of this area. It opened in 1993 and was awarded that year the "Tourism for Tomorrow Award" for the Southern Hemisphere. It is supported by members of four nearby villages, who have helped make it a success.

One of the tributaries of the Sua Pan is the Mosetse River. The village of Mosetse is named for it and lies along the river.

Sua Pan, Botswana

Mahalapye

Mahalapye is a town located in the Central District of Botswana. The town has about 41,000 inhabitants and is situated along the main road between the capital Gaborone and the second largest city Francistown. Mahalapye has a bus station, a railway station, a couple of hotels and a market area with many shops and fast food restaurants, Water Shed mall is the latest attraction to those travelling from Gaborone to Francistown, great place for refreshments. It also has several petrol stations, some open 24 hours per day. Being situated on the edge of the Kalahari desert it is quite dry, and the local waterways are dry except during the rainy season. In recent times, it has become a convenient stop-over town for travelers travelling to and from Gaborone.

This town is located on the Tropic of Capricorn. Thus at approximately 13:11 hours on 21 December, or at solar noon on Summer Solstice, the sun will be directly overhead at this site. To mark this geographic feature there is a small monument just outside town on the 23rd parallel, or 23 degrees South of the equator. At this time the sun will be directly above this monument where the sun reaches its furthest point South. At this point there will be no shadow on the monument.

Mahalapye, Botswana

Linyanti

The Linyanti Marsh, located at the Northwest corner of the park and to the North of Savuti, is adjacent to the Linyanti River. To the west of this area lies Selinda Reserve and on the northern bank of Kwando River is Namibia's Nkasa Rupara National Park. Around these 2 rivers are riverine woodlands, open woodlands as well as lagoons, and the rest of the region mainly consists of flood plains. There are here large concentrations of the lion, leopard, African wild dog, roan antelope, sable antelope, a hippopotamus pod and enormous herds of elephants. The rarer red lechwe, sitatunga and a bask of crocodiles also occur in the area. Bird life is very rich here.

Between Linyanti and Savuti Marshes lies a hot and dry hinterland, mainly occupied by the Nogatsaa grass woodland. This section is little known and is a great place for spotting elands.

Chobe National Park, Botswana